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logic

Review: Total Truth by Nancy Pearcey

  Few books have been recommended to me as highly as Total Truth by Nancy Pearcey.  This book about Liberating Christianity from its Cultural Captivity more than lives up to its reputation. I suppose the whole premise of Total Truth is summed up in this thought:  “Redemption is not just about being saved from sin, […]

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Review: True Reason by Gilson and Weitnauer

Atheists sometimes claim that they represent reason and that Christianity is anti-intellectual and inherently unreasonable.  True Reason, a collection of 18 essays, discusses this idea and meets atheists’ arguments head on…if they have presented arguments that can be reasoned with; otherwise True Reason points out their lack of logic and careful thought. Sometimes deep, sometimes […]

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Review: Logic Resources from The Critical Thinking Company

My husband wants our kids to be able to think. He especially wants them to be able to think critically about all the information and ideas they are being fed every day. That’s why we emphasize logic in our homeschool. We’ve used a wide variety of resources over the years. While we use other materials […]

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Review: James Madison Critical Thinking Course

As our culture becomes increasingly visual, it is more important than ever to be able to think critically.  One very helpful resource for high school students is the James Madison Critical Thinking Course. A formidable-looking 534-page book, the James Madison Critical Thinking Course introduces the learner to both critical thinking and logic by analyzing crime […]

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Review: The Fallacy Detective by the Bluedorns

Every year when I ask my husband what should be a priority for our homeschool, he mentions logic, so the children study logic from about age 11 and on. Some years it’s a great learning experience, and some years it’s fun. When we study The Fallacy Detective by Nathaniel Bluedorn and Hans Bluedorn, it’s both. In […]

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