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nature study

The Light that does not Change

One morning the whole world shone silver—the snow, the sky, the ice on the trees, and even the light itself. It was dramatic and I rushed outside to take pictures before the unique light faded. A bit later, I turned around and saw this tree, sunshine glinting off the icy trunks. Light seems to change […]

Frozen Water

This week trees dripped with tiny icicles from an unusual episode of freezing rain. Some of the icicles stayed for more than a day, softening the evergreens and spring-colored bushes into pastel versions of themselves. Water hurried through the ditches but when the cold overpowered the current, it crystalized into glassy sheets and patterns. There […]

Slow Spring

A slow thaw from Monday, above, to Friday, below. Although it spring is coming very slowly, we know it’s on its way.  The red-winged black birds are back and so are many other early morning songsters.  We even saw a robin last week! As it snows again today, I remember God’s promise to Noah: While […]

Clouds

We have some amazing clouds at times. With air masses often colliding over our region, our skyscapes are can be much more intriguing than those of the prairies where I grew up. But sometimes even non-dramatic clouds lead to questions. A few days ago we had these silky, almost polished clouds on one side of […]

Review: The Invention of Clouds by Richard Hamblyn

Naming things is a powerful activity—it was man’s first task in Genesis—and this power is explored in Richard Hamblyn’s brilliant book The Invention of Clouds: How an Amateur Meteorologist Forged the Language of the Skies. I do not think I have ever read such a satisfying, lyrical, information-packed science history book before, although I have […]

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