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Planting Day, Finally!

 

Today we planted our cucumbers, summer squashes, hot pepper seedlings, and the entire 1000 square foot squash and pumpkin garden.  Finally!  Ten days ago we wanted to do this, but it was still too cold.  Sigh

 

 

So, right after breakfast, one child measured out the squash garden, marked the rows, and dug holes where each squash hill should be.  The next child filled them with compost from our messy but productive compost pile.  The little one piled dirt (left over from making the hole) on top the compost and put a marker stick in the center of each hill.  And then the last one put the seeds in.  What a system!  It worked amazingly well. 

 

Meanwhile, I discovered and eradicated a patch of luxuriant quack grass  roots which would have turned the garden into a pasture by the fall.  I had to hurry to weed the entire squash garden before it was planted, maneuvering around holes and hills.   And then, it was done!  Finished!

 

Now all that’s left to do is to put down black plastic mulch for the watermelons and to plant  them.  And then, a bit of weeding, mulching (with straw), watering (maybe), and harvesting. 

 

God will be doing many miracles in our garden and we get to watch them, one by one.  What a blessing!

 

If you garden, enjoy your back-yard miracles.  If you don’t garden, buy a tomato plant or some herbs and tuck them into a pot (in good soil, don’t skimp), and you, too, can have the thrill of watching God grow food for you.

 

Have a blessed Sunday and see you on Tuesday or earlier, for another Tea Time with Annie Kate!

 

5 Comments

  1. solidrock says:

    Wow ! You have a large garden. We use to. But with physical limitations we have cut back. I planted a new flower garden this year. Did lots of herbs in pots and enriched the wildflower gardens. I do miss planting the veggie garden! Can't wait to see photos!

    Today will be restful. I am traveling with my son to a camp where he is going to be worship leader this week. I am going just for the evening but will enjoy it very much.

  2. Anonymous says:

    I'm jealous of your 1000 sq ft garden! Mine is 16 sq ft! My husband knows I don't exactly have a green thumb and refuses to devote any more space than that until I prove myself. :o) Enjoy! It sounds like a wonderful garden.

  3. solidrock says:

    Hello. I did not have any problems with the web site. Not sure what the problem is. Its a great resource.

  4. AnnieKate says:

    Hey, my first one was 16 square feet, too, because that was all the sod the children and I had energy to remove! Then we didn't dare eat the salad mix we planted, because we didn't know which plants were salad and which were local weeds.

    We've come a long ways since then, and it's been a fun, learning experience. Psst, actually the current garden is 4000 square feet total; we cut back this year because of my health. (The 1000 square feet is for the winter squashes and pumpkins only.) But remember, we started with 16 square feet, and that's a good place to start.

    Blessings,

    Annie Kate

  5. IllinoisLoriH says:

    Thanks for stopping by my blog earlier; I posted an answer there, but will repeat it here for ya 🙂

    The botanic name for Hens & Chicks is "Sempervivum," with one of the species being "tectorum." Sempervivum means "live always," (evergreen), and tectorum means "on roofs."

    They were commonly used in medievil Europe; they were thought to protect a house against fire/lightening strikes (succulents don't burn so good!). You can apparantly still find some old English cottages with them, and I'm sure they're in other parts of Europe, as well, just out in the countryside.

    I have looked online for a photo of an old cottage with a Sempervivum roof, and so far haven't found one…so my "mind's eye" will have to suffice!

    God Bless,

    Lori (aka "Plans4You")

    http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/plans4you

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