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Review: Faith Like Potatoes

Farmer Angus Buchan, extremely stressed, moves his family from trouble in Zambia to trouble in South Africa.  Angus tries to settle onto his new farm but he struggles, falling apart and constantly losing his temper, until his sweet wife is in despair and wants to get tranquilizers for him.  Then she convinces him to attend church.

Eventually Angus comes to faith and becomes a peaceful, caring man.  Other miracles occur as well, but life is still full of trouble.  Angus tries his best to live for God and to encourage the people of his country to do so as well.  Finally, in an extreme drought when farmers are warned not to plant anything at all, he feels called to plant potatoes.  Is this faith or foolishness?

Faith Like Potatoes is fast-paced and full of excellent acting, good cinematography, a real feel for the people, and intense emotions.  It’s also full of questions and quandaries about faith:  what is faith, when does God act, and what is the dividing line between faith and foolishness?  Of course, God does not always answer prayer in dramatic ways, he does not always heal the land, and, as the movie shows, disasters are not always averted.

We recommend Faith Like Potatoes as a thoughtful, quality Christian movie that grapples honestly with hard themes without losing its goodness.  One expert even likened it to Fireproof on steroids.

View the trailer.   

Caution:  One heartrending episode, resulting from behaviors my father never allowed on his farm, left me devastated.  So even though this film is rated PG and is very worthwhile to watch, beware that can be intense.

Disclosure: A friend loaned me this movie and encouraged me to watch it.

5 Comments

  1. Annie Kate says:

    Wow! That’s wonderful, and I really hope you will get to see him. That would be so exciting!

  2. […] Kate gives her thoughts on Faith Like Potatoes. I’ve wanted to see this movie for a while and just need to see which library in the area has a […]

  3. Laraba says:

    I read the book, and the really sad thing was so sad in the BOOK I decided I was afraid to watch the movie.

    1. Annie Kate says:

      Yes, I understand completely.

      But I’ve discussed it with the kids, and they did not think it overwhelmingly sad. Perhaps you have to be a parent to be devastated by it.

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